Japanese Honor Feast scroll


A commemorative scroll given at Three Mountains Honor Feast October 2015. 

Sumi ink on hemp and recycled paper, mounted  on paper imitating brocade fabric, as if a hand scroll. 

Hand is a pseudo hand found here. http://www.wodefordhall.com/hackhand.pdf
This was hard. I needed to do an SCA compatible scroll for a feast in honor of a Momoyama era Japanese persona. My confidence level with sumi painting is low. I found either more complex screens with some words or very sparse wordless paintings, or complex paintings with many words. I then found an item that was a journal in poetic form with simple paintings. 

Record of the author’s trip to the eastern capital.

Karasumaru Mitshuhiro. Early 17th c. (Before 1638). Found in Momoyama, Japanese art in an age of grandeur. 

This isn’t quite like that, but it’s where I started.


I loosely based the mountain view on these two pictures I had taken of Mt Hood, which is one of the Three Mountains referenced in the Barony ‘s name. 


The text was my favorite part to do. It’s based on the waka forms, which varied somewhat thru SCA period, with tanka (5 syllables/7 syllables/ 5 syllables/7 syllables/5 syllables) looking like a consistent option.  Of course this is composed in English. So, this is the recipients OP worked into a seasonal cycle of  five tanka. Or maybe since it’s linked it should be called renga. Hmm. 

The moon wanes quickly

Leaves turn, chill eastern winds blow

In bright October 

Three mountains honors Kateline

Who we now call Tsukiko


Gracious Baroness

Not even queens forget her 

Hands filled with largess

Her works a river of stars

Joyful and illuminating


Lightly she dances

Like the sun on the mountain

Pink in the sunset

Is the snow on myrtle leaves

Pine cones fall near the lions paws

Sweetly sing the frogs

Hidden in new trilliums

Pelican she is

Even her blood will she give

As blossoms lend us beauty

Let waterfalls leap

When rainbows bridge the mountains

Dragonflies flicker

Tea from our Tsukikos hands

All Three Mountains rejoices

Sources:

Momoyama, Japanese Art in the Age of Grandeur: An Exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art Organized in Collaboration with the Agency for Cultural Affairs of the Japanese Government. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1975. Print.

Hickman, Money L. Japan’s Golden Age: Momoyama. New Haven: Yale UP in Association with Sun & Star 1996 and Dallas Museum of Art, 1996. Print.
Yamada, Sadami. Complete Sumi-e Techniques. Rutland, Vt.: Japan Publ. Trading, 1966. Print.

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